Andalucia Emprende

La Red Territorial de Apoyo a Emprendedores es un instrumento de la Junta de Andalucía puesto al servicio de las personas emprendedoras y empresas de la Comunidad. Gestionada por Andalucía Emprende, esta red cuenta en la actualidad con más de 200 Centros de Apoyo al Desarrollo Empresarial, distribuidos en 37 zonas CADE, desde donde un cualificado equipo técnico de especialistas en las distintas materias empresariales, presta servicios de apoyo a la creación y consolidación de empresas y empleo, dando cobertura al 100% de los municipios andaluces.
Además, estos especialistas prestan servicios destinados a identificar los sectores emergentes de cada territorio, articular los tejidos productivos locales y fomentar la cultura emprendedora en la sociedad, mediante el desarrollo de acciones de dinamización.
www.andaluciaemprende.es

La Caixa
La Caixa is one of the largest banks in Spain and Europe, and it’s the one that most involved in new technologies, startups and venture capital investment.
www.lacaixa.es

MV&A

MV & A is one of the 15 largest law firms in Spain in account control and bussines law. MV & A manages the interests of some of the most important companies in Andalusia.
www.mv-asociados.es

Serendipia
Serendipia is a new coworking space in Cordoba. It offers services and work-space for more than 50 companies. Serendipia is expected to shelter the most innovative startups in Andalusia in its early stages.

coworking-cordoba.es

Universidad Loyola

Pasión por conocer, compromiso por transformar, exelencia, vocación de servicio, universialidad y apertura
uloyola.es

Indra

Indra es la multinacional de Consultoría y Tecnología líder en España y Latinoamérica. Ofrece soluciones y servicios tecnológicos para los sectores de Transporte y Tráfico, Energía e Industria, Administración Pública y Sanidad, Servicios Financieros, Seguridad y Defensa y Telecom y Media.
indracompany.com

Top Four Tips on How To Develop a Good Startup Idea, According to Matthew MacFarlane

Posted by Joe Garza on 2014-04-22

Budding founders on the path of entrepreneurship are more likely to create successful startups if they keep a few key ideas in mind, according to Matthew MacFarlane, investment director of Yuuwa Venture Capital.

Matthew MacFarlane will speak at the forthcoming Perth Founder Institute event, Startup Funding 101: How to Work With an Investor.

Below are MacFarlane’s four tips on how entrepreneurs can develop good startup ideas, as described by Rose Powell in an article on StartupSmart titled Top four tips from a venture capitalist on how to develop a good start-up idea.

Commercialization and customer understanding before product

A prevalent quandary startups struggle with is conceiving a viable business model around a preexisting product. MacFarlane says that founders should not build anything before establishing how it will make money.

The biggest challenge for many startups ideas is people are more focused on the product than the commercial potential. They’re excited about how cool the technology is but haven’t worked out how it’s actually ever going to make money.” - Matthew MacFarlane

Make sure your potential customers actually care and maybe even cry

Founders should go a step beyond merely asking what their potential customers want, and determine if customers would cry if a product or service was taken away. A definitive demand for a product or service needs to be ascertained prior to effectuating a business model.

You need to know how badly do customers need what you’re offering so you can work out what would they pay for it. The more likely they’ll cry, the more they’ll pay. You need to aim to create something where if you told them your service was shutting down, there should be an outcry.”

Go to a Startup Weekend if you’ve never developed an idea into a product before

Startup Weekends are propitious for growing startup ecosystems, and product developers have found them immensely helpful.

One of the absolutely best ways of learning how to start-up is go to a Startup Weekend. Because in two days of your life, you realise exactly what steps a startup needs to go through to take an idea to execution.”

Don’t avoid the emotional stuff

Co-founders who don’t resolve personal issues and clearly delineate the division of responsibilities run the risk of encountering obstacles in the future. Getting tough conversations about roles and equity out of the way prior to any startup endeavor is crucial.

The other challenge that is relevant for all entrepreneurs is the issue of co-founders and sorting that out early. People tend to ignore this because it’s emotive and touchy feely, but when you do, it almost always causes problems.”

(Young businessman thinking in front of a wall with cloud thought above his head photo by shutterstock)

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