HOTB Software Solutions
HOTB is a highly experienced software development company that provides in-kind angel capital to startup entrepreneurs with a viable technology based business. HOTB helps startups bridge the gap between their friends and family round and their venture capital round by subsidizing expensive technology needs. HOTB specializes in building custom software platforms to provide certainty of execution, experience, credibility, security and compliance. Additionally, HOTB Ventures has been formed for instances of passive investment when software development is not needed.

Manatt
Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP is known for quality, for extraordinary commitment to clients, for integrated, relationship-based services, and for a range of capabilities typically found only in boutique firms. We are progressive and entrepreneurial compared to other major firms, and we are deeply committed to diversity, to public service, to involvement in the communities we serve and to excellence in all we do.

TriNet
Tech companies partner with TriNet Passport to compete for top talent by using our bundled HR products that cover the core services of payroll, fortune 100 benefits, risk and compliance, a scalable HR team all on a cloud platform. TriNet reduces the time businesses spend managing HR and administrative issues while providing enterprise-grade cloud capabilities. This enables entrepreneurs and management to focus on what’s important from raising funds to driving revenue. Join hundreds of executives in high tech who have experienced the TriNet Passport difference, working for companies in hardware, software, SaaS and telecommunications. Contact choy.chew@trinet.com for more information.

Eureka
The Eureka Building is a 3-acre technology campus in Irvine, California designed to help accelerate innovation. Founded in 2014 by Peter Polydor, our goal is to support local entrepreneurship by giving innovative companies and entrepreneurs in Orange County a home that is centrally located and easy to access. Through partnerships we are more than just a home, but are a support network hosting startup events while fostering mentorship relationships with our partners all within one of the most creative spaces in the region.

CrashLabs
CRASHLABS IS A VIBRANT COWORKING AND EVENTS COMMUNITY THAT ENHANCES WORK/LIFE BALANCE FOR THE NEW ECONOMY OF UNTETHERED WORKERS. CRASHLABS OFFERS CREATIVE AND FLEXIBLE SPACES SUCH AS OPEN DESKS, DEDICATED DESKS, PRIVATE OFFICES, AND EVENTS SPACE THAT SERVE EVERYONE FROM THE INDIVIDUAL TO CORPORATIONS.

Real Office Centers
At ROC you’ll find a cohesive and progressive working environment with professional support for entrepreneurs, innovators, and today’s leaders. Beyond merely providing the physical workspace, we contribute to your capital growth by facilitating innovation, inspiration, and collaboration. With professional support services, educational events, and a stimulating environment, ROC is where you and your company will grow. Our open-source work environment and friendly staff complete with private receptionists keep business running smoothly. ROC handles day-to-day operations and facility management so your company can focus on what it does best.

Launching a Startup on Sabbatical: How to Get the Most Out of Your Leave, by George Roche

Posted by Jonathan Greechan on 2013-06-24

Led by a desire for social change, George Roche did what many employees dream of - he took a sabbatical. During his four month leave, he took part in the Washington DC Founder Institute and launched Small Small - a benefit company that sells Ethiopian spice and sauce and gives back to Ethiopian farmers with each sale.

George recently shared his experience with Forbes, outlining how to get the most out of your sabbatical, and getting your company to agree to it in the first place.

Below are George’s tips for How to gain approval and be productive during your sabbatical;

1) Figure out what you want to do.

Create something that’s new and bold. Brainstorm with friends, family, and potential customers to land on a progressive idea that’s tackling traditional issues with a new approach. In the case of Small Small, our impact is from creating demand for Ethiopian agricultural products and from reinvesting a portion of every sale to NGOs teaching modern agriculture in Ethiopia. A new approach to an old problem.

2) Make your case impossible to turn down.

Offering sabbaticals is a win-win for the employer and the employee. Outline your goals and tie them to your professional brand, explaining how it will help you and (more importantly) your employer grow. Keep the potential experiences relevant to your employer.

3) Build a network.

Having a group of stalwart supporters and mentors to bounce ideas off of is critical. Use the sabbatical as a way to expand your business network. Make new contacts and put yourself out there. Stay in touch with the people you meet—call, send regular email updates, and meet in person when you can. When you launch the organization or introduce a new product, you’ll be thankful you did. Also, surround yourself with people who have started organizations before—they’ll be able to immensely help along the way and think through your plan.

4) Make a plan and keep it structured (but flexible).

Sabbaticals typically last between one to six months (which go by faster than you might think). Make an outline of how you need to spend your time before you get started. List your activities and goals and create project milestones to match. It’s better to give yourself short deadlines. This forces you to work towards milestones effectively. Remember that flexibility is key with startups—you’ll encounter new challenges that shift your original plans. Roll with the punches. Even if you aren’t able to get everything done, you’ll still be amazed by your progress.

5) Plan for your (inevitable) return and share the wealth.

The sabbatical will come to an end before you know it. But you and your employer invested time and resources, and stopping outright would be a loss for all. Try to find a way to keep the connections alive—nights and weekends but with full disclosure to your employer.

Just like debriefs at the end of work projects, catalog your experiences and knowledge gained from your “time off” and share them with your colleagues. Your employer is counting on you to bring back fresh insights from your experiences. Offer to write lesson plans, host brownbag lunches, and share your knowledge.

If you’re serious about starting or working for a benefit company—while bringing new experiences to your current job—then start looking into your employer’s sabbatical offerings today. You’ll only have regrets if you don’t.

Click here to read the full article on Forbes.

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Launching a Startup on Sabbatical: How to Get the Most Out of Your Leave, by George Roche

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