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Female Founder Fellowship

The Female Founder Fellowship is awarded to the most extraordinary female applicant for each semester, giving them the opportunity to participate in the Founder Institute for free. The recipient will be recognized as a female with the utmost potential to become a successful technology entrepreneur.

The Founder Institute is committed to narrowing the gender gap in high tech startups. When we announced the Female Founder Fellowship program in 2011, only 16% of Founder Institute companies were founded by females. Since then, the results of this program have been astounding, as our overall number of female-founded companies has more than doubled, to a total of approximately 33%. This is more than twice as high as most other startup programs. Learn more about the Female Founder Fellowship program here

Eligibility: In order to be eligible for the Female Founder Fellowship for the upcoming semester, you must complete your application, be accepted to the program, and submit your payment by the Early Deadline listed on the top of this page. Any female who follows these guidelines will be automatically eligible - no further steps are required. 

Grant: The Female Founder Fellowship is awarded to the most extraordinary female applicant for each semester. The recipient will be awarded and notified within 5 days after the Early Admissions Deadline, and they will receive a full refund on their Course Fee within 1 week of the program start date. All applicants will be notified via email when the Fellowships are awarded.

Click here to apply for the Female Founder Fellowship

This Week’s Must-Read Articles for Entrepreneurs

Posted by Jonathan Greechan on 2014-01-04

Each week we scour the web for insightful articles to share with the Founder Institute network.

This week's top articles include 4 things investors need to know about your startup; 10 important startup metrics; why entrepreneurs must have thick skin and soft hearts; and more.

 Check out our must read articles for the week of December 29 - January 4:

4 Things Investors Need to Know About Your Startup
Angels, venture capitalists, private equity firms and mutual funds all evaluate investments on the same four basic criteria. At the various stages of a company's evolution from brilliant-insight baby to billion-dollar behemoth, those investors will weigh your attributes differently. When you pitch your company for funding, focus on these four topics:
Your Startup's 10 Most Important Metrics
Here are the ten metrics I’ve found to be most useful in board meetings. They answer the questions of how should a startup founder might measuring the business at the highest level. You should have many more metrics than these, but I’ve highlighted the ones that I recommend presenting to your board and reviewing each week.
Can-Do vs. Can't-Do Culture
Lately, it has become in vogue to write articles, comments and tweets about everything that’s wrong with young technology companies. Hardly a day goes by where I don’t find something in my Twitter feed crowing about how a startup that has hit a bump in the road is ”fu&%@d,” or what an “as*h%le” a successful founder is, or what an utterly idiotic idea somebody’s company is.
7 Reasons Entrepreneurs Must Have Thick Skin and Soft Hearts

You will find when you have developed thick skin and a strong heart the word “procrastination” is no longer a part of your vocabulary. You will not only be unafraid to do uncomfortable things anymore, you will actually be excited to do them. Nobody puts off something they are excited about. So go do what you don’t want to do, go after what you want, and take every shot that you have to in order to give yourself a chance to achieve your goals and live the life you truly want.

10 Signs You're Not Cut Out to Be an Entrepreneur

About half of Americans dream of opening their own businesses, according to a recent survey by the UPS Store, but with 50% of small businesses failing within the first five years, how do you know if you're an entrepreneur ... or a "wanna-preneur"? Before you take the leap, Steenerson suggests taking an honest inventory of your skill set. He offers these ten clues that you're not cut out to launch a business:

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